Weeper’s Joy

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Cocktail History

The Weeper’s Joy is a vintage cocktail that was created by William Schmidt and included in his book The Flowing Bowl: When & What To Drink. Although many variations of the drink exist in the modern day, it’s traditionally made with absinthe, vermouth, kümmel, simple syrup, and citrus, resulting in an extremely dry recipe that appeals to those with more developed palates.

Cocktail Ingredients

To make this cocktail, you’ll need the following ingredients:

Absinthe: This is the base spirit. It adds its distinct licorice aroma. We used Amerique 1912 Absinthe Verte made by Great Lakes Distillery in Milwaukee, Wisconsin because it’s made locally to us.

Kümmel: This is a liqueur. It’s sweet and colorless, and it adds flavors of cumin, fennel, and caraway seeds.

Sweet Vermouth: This is a fortified wine that adds sweetness. We used Carpano Antica Formula Vermouth because it’s Alex’s favorite sweet vermouth, with dark notes of herbs, figs, licorice, cinnamon, and cocoa.

Simple Syrup: This is a sweetener made with sugar and water. You can buy bottled simple syrup in a store, but we made ours at home using Alex’s recipe because it tastes better fresh and is very easy to make.

Orange Curaçao: This is a citrus liqueur that adds sweet orange flavor. We used Grand Marnier because it offers additional notes of Cognac, orange, and vanilla bean.

Tasting Notes

The Weeper’s Joy features strong aromas of anise and caraway as well as a sharp and dry spirit-forward taste with strong absinthe flavor, a bit of vanilla, and only a touch of orange sweetness, all of which finishes with a complex aftertaste that leaves anise and other herbal notes on the tongue and throat.

Our Opinion of This Cocktail Recipe: Because this drink is so aggressively herbal and dry, Kendall couldn’t even finish her first sip, to be honest. Meanwhile, Alex, who is a casual enjoyer of these kinds of cocktail oddities, found it palatable but definitely had to finish it very, very slowly.

Alex’s Take: ⭐⭐
“The book claims that this drink will cause those with “bold palates” to weep with joy upon drinking it, and I agree whole-heartedly with that. This drink is aggressive and not for the faint of heart. Apart from being pretty high in alcohol content, it offers little respite in the way of sweetness and instead batters the tastebuds with herbs, especially anise and fennel. And that taste sticks in the mouth the whole way through. I personally enjoyed the drink since I like recipes that are almost too weird to actually enjoy, but I agree it definitely needs to be consumed in moderation. I don’t believe absinthe makes you hallucinate, but too many of these would probably have most drinkers starting to question their surroundings with the bold aromas, flavors, and ABV they contain.”

Kendall’s Take: ⭐
“Yikes, this is one serious drink! I’m not a fan of absinthe’s licorice taste, so I knew going into the tasting I likely wouldn’t care for this drink. That was, in fact, the case; I actually couldn’t make it past one sip. I can see how those who enjoy absinthe’s distinct taste like Alex would really like this, but ultimately I wouldn’t make it again.”

Recipe

This cocktail recipe was adapted from The Art of Vintage Cocktails by Stephanie Rosenbaum.

AuthorThe Art of Vintage CocktailsPrep Time5 minsRating

Ingredients
 1 oz Absinthe
 1 oz Sweet Vermouth
 1 oz Kümmel
 ½ tsp Homemade Simple Syrup
 2 dashes Orange Curaçao

Method
1

Add absinthe, sweet vermouth, kümmel, simple syrup, orange curaçao, and ice to a mixing glass.

2

Stir for 30-45 seconds.

3

Strain into a cocktail glass.

Ingredients

Ingredients
 1 oz Absinthe
 1 oz Sweet Vermouth
 1 oz Kümmel
 ½ tsp Homemade Simple Syrup
 2 dashes Orange Curaçao

Directions

Method
1

Add absinthe, sweet vermouth, kümmel, simple syrup, orange curaçao, and ice to a mixing glass.

2

Stir for 30-45 seconds.

3

Strain into a cocktail glass.

Weeper’s Joy

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More Absinthe Cocktails

If you like this absinthe-based cocktail recipe, here are a few others we’ve tried that you may enjoy:

De La Louisiane: A rye cocktail made with Bénédictine, sweet vermouth, absinthe, Peychaud’s Creole bitters, and a cherry

Tuxedo No. 2: A gin cocktail made with dry vermouth, cherry liqueur, absinthe, orange bitters, and a lemon twist

Sazerac: A rye cocktail made with simple syrup, Peychaud’s Creole bitters, absinthe, and a lemon twist

Brain Duster: A rye cocktail made with absinthe, sweet vermouth, Angostura aromatic bitters, and a lemon twist

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